Technology, Thoughts & Trinkets

Touring the digital through type

In Support of Chelsea Manning Entering Canada

‘Chelsea Manning’ by Tim Travers Hawkins (CC BY-SA 4.0) at https://goo.gl/mhhbdm

Earlier this month I composed and sent a letter in support of Chelsea Manning being permitted to enter Canada. Manning previously released classified military and diplomatic documents to Wikileaks. Those documents shed light on American activities in Iraq as well as diplomatic efforts around the world, to the effect of revealing US avoidance of cluster munition bans, US pressure on the Italian government to drop charged against CIA operatives who conducted extraordinary rendition activities, and the actual causality rates suffered by Iraqi citizens. She was disallowed entry last year when Canadian officials asserted that the crimes associated with her whistleblowing in the United States were akin to a violation of Canadian treason laws. The letter that I wrote in support of her entry to Canada is reproduced, below.


October 13, 2017

 

Hon. Ahmed Hussen
Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship

Hon. Ralph Goodale
Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

RE:     Welcoming Chelsea Manning to Canada

 

Dear Minister Hussen and Minister Goodale:

I am writing as a Research Associate at the Citizen Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs, at the University of Toronto to ask you to allow Chelsea Manning to enter Canada. Refusing her entry to the country is a real loss for Canada and an injustice to whistleblowers who expose information in the public interest.

Chelsea is an internationally recognized advocate for freedom of expression, transparency, and civil liberties. As a whistleblower, she revealed documents that—among other things—exposed the disproportionate impact of military activities abroad on civilians, including journalists and children. Her work has been used by academics across Canada to understand the impacts American adventurism, the relationships between American diplomats and government officials with autocratic governments, and the status of copyright negotiations between US officials and their foreign counterparts. Documents that she provided to the public also shed light on critical issues such as the United States’ avoidance of cluster munitions bans, the United States’ pressure on the Italian government to drop charges against CIA operatives who engaged in renditions, American military executions of civilians, and Iraqi civilian death tolls. She has received a host of awards from prominent media and human rights organizations for this work.

Not all Canadians will agree with what Chelsea did or what she stands for—but as a country that values freedom of expression, open dialogue, and human rights we should permit her to visit and speak in Canada. She stands as a guiding light for persons to stand up and both do what they believe to be honorable and right, as well as be held to account for those beliefs and corresponding actions.

Whether Chelsea wishes to enter Canada to continue her work to advocate for social change or simply to visit friends, there is no principled reason to turn her away. She has served her time in a US military prison after accepting responsibility for her actions. Her sentence was commuted by former US President Barack Obama in January 2017 and she has been living freely in the United States since May 2017. Continuing to deny her entry to Canada would serve no rational benefit to public safety and would undermine Canada’s commitment to international justice and human rights.

Letting Chelsea enter Canada would affirm Canada’s values of dialogue, freedom of expression, and human rights. More than that, letting Chelsea in is simply the right thing to do.

I look forward to hearing news of your decision.

Regards,

Dr. Christopher Parsons
Research Associate, Citizen Lab, Munk School of
Global Affairs, at the University of Toronto

Update to the SIGINT Summaries

As part of my ongoing research into the Edward Snowden documents, I have found and added an additional document to the Canadian SIGINT Summaries. The Summaries include downloadable copies of leaked Communications Security Establishment (CSE) documents (and those pertaining to CSE activities), along with summary, publication, and original source information. CSE is Canada’s foreign signals intelligence agency and has operated since the Second World War.

Documents were often produced by CSE’s closest partners which, collectively, form the ‘Five Eyes’ intelligence network. This network includes the CSE, the National Security Agency (NSA), the Government Commsiunications Headquarters (GCHQ), Australian Signals Directorate (ASD), and Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB).

All of the documents are available for download from this website. Though I am hosting the documents they were all first published by another party. The new documents and their summaries are listed below. The full list of documents and their summary information is available on the Canadian SIGINT Summaries page.

This document came to my attention as part of analysis of NSA-Japanese signals intelligence cooperation. The Canadian-centric aspect of the document concerns the number of High Frequency Direction Finding sites that were, as of 2005, operated by Canada.

CROSSHAIR — Foreign Partners Filling HF/DF Gaps for the US

Summary: This brief article identifies the number of second-party High Frequency Direction Finding (HF/DF) resources, along with contributing third-parties, which collectively compose the CROSSHAIR network with US government assets. The CROSSHAIR covername refers to a project that consolidated all US Service Cryptologic Element (SCE) HF/DF resources and enables data operability with partners.

Canada possessed four sites at time of writing, Great Britain six, and Australia and New Zealand one each. Third-parties, including Austria, Denmark, Ethiopia, Hungary, Israel, India, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Korea, Netherlands, Norway, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Sweden, and Taiwan, also shared with the NSA and, in some cases, directly with one another. The NSA recognizes, in this document, that without the third-party collaborators the NSA would lack a world-wide network for Direction Finding.

Document Published: April 24, 2017
Document Dated: February 25, 2005
Document Length: 1 pages
Associated Article: Japan Made Secret Deals With The NSA That Expanded Global Surveillance
Download Document: CROSSHAIR — Foreign Partners Filling HF/DF Gaps for the US
Classification: TOP SECRET//SI//TK//REL TO USA, AUS, CAN, GBR, NZL
Authoring Agency: NSA
Codenames: CROSSHAIR

Horizontal Accountability and Signals Intelligence: Lesson Drawing from Annual Electronic Surveillance Reports

‘Radome at Hartland Point’ by shirokazan (CC BY 2.0) at https://flic.kr/p/dfn9ei

Adam Molnar and I have a new paper on accountability and signals intelligence, which we will be presenting at the Security Intelligence & Surveillance in the Big Data Age workshop. The workshop will be held at the University of Ottawa later this month as part of the Big Data Surveillance partnership project that is funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

The paper focuses exclusively on the mechanisms which are needed for civil society actors to evaluate the propriety of actions undertaken by signals intelligence agencies. In it, we argue that Canada’s foreign signals intelligence agency’s public accountability reporting might be enhanced by drawing on lessons from existing statutory electronic surveillance reporting. Focusing exclusively on Canada’s signals intelligence agency, the Communications Security Establishment (CSE), we first outline the relationships between accountability of government agencies to their respective Ministers and Members of Parliament, the role of transparency in enabling governmental accountability to the public, and the link between robust accountability regimes and democratic legitimacy of government action. Next, we feature a contemporary bulk data surveillance practice undertaken by Canada’s signals intelligence agency and the deficiencies in how CSE’s existing review body makes the Establishment’s practices publicly accountable to Parliamentarians and the public alike. We then discuss how proposed changes to CSE oversight and review mechanisms will not clearly rectify the existing public accountability deficits. We conclude by proposing a principle-based framework towards a robust public accountability process that is linked to those underlying domestic and foreign statutory electronic surveillance reports.

A copy of our paper, titled, “Horizontal Accountability and Signals Intelligence: Lesson Drawing from Annual Electronic Surveillance Reports,” is available at the Social Sciences Research Network as well as for download from this website.

Update to the SIGINT Summaries

As part of my ongoing research into the Edward Snowden documents, I have added an additional document to the Canadian SIGINT Summaries. The Summaries include downloadable copies of leaked Communications Security Establishment (CSE) documents, along with summary, publication, and original source information. CSE is Canada’s foreign signals intelligence agency and has operated since the Second World War.

Documents were often produced by CSE’s closest partners which, collectively, form the ‘Five Eyes’ intelligence network. This network includes the CSE, the National Security Agency (NSA), the Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ), Australian Signals Directorate (ASD), and Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB).

All of the documents are available for download from this website. Though I am hosting the documents they were all first published by another party. The new documents and their summaries are listed below. The full list of documents and their summary information is available on the Canadian SIGINT Summaries page.

Hackers are Humans too: Cyber leads to Cl leads

Summary: This slide set showcases one method that CSE uses to expose the management structure and operators behind Computer Network Exploitation (CNE) activities, namely using passive infrastructure tasking and contact chaining. By monitoring infrastructure that was exposed through malware or content delivery for anomalous network sessions the CSE was subsequently able to trace MAKERSMARK (i.e. Russian) operations.

While MAKERSMARK’s less attributed systems can make it challenging to effectively trace to operators, these were poorly used and the operators exposed information associated with their’ personal lives. Furthermore, the development organization responsible for MAKERSMARK less attributed systems was infected by crimewave and CSE (or other friendly intelligence agencies) were consequently able to collect information which was being exfiltrated to criminal organizations.

The slide deck concludes with the warning the it is important to follow counter intelligence leads, quickly, because opportunities don’t last forever. Moreover, there was a warning that as a CNE program matures, such as that run by MAKERSMARK, the operational security associated with the program will similarly mature.

Document Published: August 2, 2017
Document Dated: Post 2009
Document Length: 13 pages
Associated Article: White House Says Russia’s Hackers Are Too Good To Be Caught But NSA Partner Called Them “Morons”
Download Document: Hackers are Humans too: Cyber leads to Cl leads
Classification: TS//SI/REL TO CAN, AUS, GBR, NZL, and USA
Authoring Agency: CSE
Codenames: MAKERSMARK

« Older posts